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Mobility | What's Happening in the Brain

In general, there are two types of brain problems that can result in mobility impairment in people with dementia.

One type comes about because deep brain structures known as the basal ganglia are affected. This can be due to the dementing disease itself (for example, in dementia with Lewy bodies , the basal ganglia are affected early; in Alzheimer's disease , they are usually affected only much later) or from drugs (for example, drugs called neuroleptics that are used to treat agitation).

Another type of mobility problem comes from the 'thinking' parts of the brain, that integrate all the information needed to carry out purposeful movements. A problem with movement at that level of the brain is known as apraxia .

The mobility problems that come about when the basal ganglia are involved are known as Parkinsonism . The word comes from 'Parkinson's disease'. Parkinson's disease is diagnosed when a person has each of the following signs: tremor, muscle rigidity , slow movements and a tendency to fall. The term Parkinsonism is used when only two or three of these signs are present.



See Also:
About Dementia > Types of Dementia > Vascular Dementia
About Dementia > Treatments for Dementia > Exercise Program
About Dementia > Treatments for Dementia > Exercise
Symptom Library > Leisure Activities > Social Interaction/ Withdrawal
Symptom Library > Physical Changes > Physical Complaints
About Dementia > Treatments for Dementia > Neuroleptics
About Dementia > Types of Dementia > Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus
About Dementia > Types of Dementia > Parkinson's Disease
About Dementia > Types of Dementia > Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus
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Last updated September 18, 2017
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